The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

or: How I learned to stop worrying and love other types of entertainment, too.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#51 Post by TravisBickle » 26 Nov 2008, 15:05

Superbly informative thread as ever dude, great stuff.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#52 Post by Nunis » 26 Nov 2008, 23:09

Excellent stuff. You're awesome; thanks for sharing!

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#53 Post by Sela » 01 Dec 2008, 07:42

Stage & Screen Online wrote:In a wide-ranging 60 minute conversation, one of the world's most popular film composers, Danny Elfman talks to Tommy Pearson about his life and career so far. Danny was in London to record his score for the up-coming biopic, Notorious (about the rapper Notorious B.I.G); in the interview he talks about his work with Tim Burton (Edward Scissorhands, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Nightmare Before Christmas, PeeWee), writing music for remakes and superheroes, composing TV themes (The Simpsons, Desperate Housewives), dealing with obsessive fans, and gives his views on The Dark Knight and the Academy Awards, the Simpsons Movie, why everyone steals from his Edward Scissorhands score at Christmas, what he thought of having his head chopped off in Family Guy, and why he paid for a TV spot to warn Americans about Sarah Palin.
A rare treat for all Danny Elfman fans.
You can find the whole interview here. It was very interesting, to say the least...
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#54 Post by Sela » 03 Dec 2008, 23:45

The Master: Part 2

So, we continue on our Jerry Goldsmith journey. There is just so much to him, that this is going to last a few more weeks.

Image A couple of posts backs I mentioned two of his concert compilations. Goldsmith was noted for how many concerts he directed of his own works. It’s certainly not rare among film composers, but he is one of the most prolific composers in this area.

His TV themes suites, or film suites are among the most famous, and he developed them more and more over the years, adding new pieces to it. So, again, I fully recommend “The Film Music of Jerry Goldsmith” (2001, Telarc) as the best starting point
Track: Motion Pictures Medley
(The Sand Pebbles, Chinatown, Air Force One, A Patch of Blue, Poltergeist, Papillon, Basic Instinct, The Wind and the Lion)

Wikipedia / IMDB


Relevant website

Jerry Goldsmith’s Soundtrack collector page

A couple of bio notes, and a portal to discover 300+ titles…


A Few more favorites
Coma
An interesting suspense title on his filmography, with a lite, but enjoyable love theme
Track: Love Theme


MacArthur
A classic title, very scarce unfortunately; almost an example of “euphoria militaris”
Track: MacArthur March

Looney Tunes – Back in action
His last score. True to the spirit of the film, sounds just like a classic looney tunes
Track: Dead Duck Walking

Logan’s Run
Does contain some futuristic sounds, but it’s his classical approach what makes this 70’s score so great.
Track: End of the City

Rambo III
Instead of going for leit-motifs, Goldsmith creates an abundant number of new themes for each of the sequels. You might be surprised by the quality of his work here
Track: Night Entry



Collectors corner, Must-Have & Small Gems

As the section indicates, here I’ll try to name 3 scores; the first, a difficult to find title, the second, is pretty much given, and the third, is a score that you may not think about that often (mainly due to the quality of the film), but it’s a surprising find.

Collector’s corner: Supergirl – Jerry Goldsmith
One of those great examples where the music might be better than the film itself. The following track showcases all three main themes in the movie (Supergirl’s, the love theme, and Selena’s monster theme)
Track: Overture

Must-Have: The Omen – Jerry Goldsmith
Jerry’s sole Oscar win came form this quintessential horror title. Gives me chills every time I listen to it.
Track: Ave Satani

Small Gems: Innerspace– Jerry Goldsmith
Only 25 mins of score, with 5 songs. And maybe just recycling other scores. But it is a perfect example and mix of what he can do, mixing themes for action, sci-fi and comedy
Track: Environmental adjust


Trivia

I had the privilege of seeing Jerry in concert twice. The second time, at the Hollywood Bowl, me and a friend finished the concert by screaming “Jerry, Jerry” a la Springer….
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#55 Post by Agrajag » 04 Dec 2008, 00:38

You're really getting me to notice scores while watching films more and more...

I noticed Eastwood's simple melody repeated throughout Changeling and really enjoyed it... I'm thinking about adding some scores to my CD collection (the only ones I currently have are two LotR scores and one Harry Potter)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#56 Post by TravisBickle » 04 Dec 2008, 04:41

Yes, I'm the same now. My coffee table has bits of paper strewn all over it with notes on scores and incidental music from the various movies I've watched recently. I think Sela5's gradually turning us into his brainwashed army, ready to ransack our nearest music stores to build up his collection when he plays us a particular piece. :D
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#57 Post by Sela » 04 Dec 2008, 04:58

TravisBickle wrote:Yes, I'm the same now. My coffee table has bits of paper strewn all over it with notes on scores and incidental music from the various movies I've watched recently. I think Sela5's gradually turning us into his brainwashed army, ready to ransack our nearest music stores to build up his collection when he plays us a particular piece. :D
Yes, my minions, yes..... :mishchief:
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#58 Post by Agrajag » 04 Dec 2008, 19:02

How do you recommend going about getting scores?

For instance, I really enjoyed Changeling as I heard it in the movie and want to try to find it to listen to just the music (if it exists yet).... Do you try to buy scores to films you have seen and enjoyed, do you blind buy based on a composer you know does well, do you just buy when you can find anything since it isn't very easy to collect?

I don't think I'll start a collection by any means, but I'm a score virgin and not sure what to do...



Also, what do you think of recent Oscar Best Score winners? The Score, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing categories were always ones I really had no idea who deserved the win.... Do you get to see and hear a lot of the nominees before Oscar night and do you often disagree with their pics or think, since these categories are voted on by a smaller body (only sound editors can vote Best Sound Editing, IIRC) are they usually the most deserving?
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#59 Post by Sela » 04 Dec 2008, 19:49

Agrajag wrote: How do you recommend going about getting scores?

For instance, I really enjoyed Changeling as I heard it in the movie and want to try to find it to listen to just the music (if it exists yet).... Do you try to buy scores to films you have seen and enjoyed, do you blind buy based on a composer you know does well, do you just buy when you can find anything since it isn't very easy to collect?

I don't think I'll start a collection by any means, but I'm a score virgin and not sure what to do...

I actually buy for all 3 reasons you gave: some blind depending on the composer (Danny Elfman, or John Williams). Some I've seen and thought "That sounded great in the movie". Some even thinking, "I bet it'll be a hard to find item later"

But my start was with what I knew I liked from the movies: Star Wars, Batman, Beetlejuice. Easily identifiable music that I wanted to listen to again. And I recommend you go this way. Then you can start exploring the composers.

Changeling is probably an interesting example. I haven't seen the movie, nor have I listened to the music. But I've heard Eastwood's music before. And he tends to compose a great main theme, easily recognizable; then he has other composers fill in the blanks for the rest of the movie. And it's a system that works great for him.

What happens then is that some of his CD's feel like you are listening to the same music over and over (Unforgiven comes to mind). But a lot of his stuff is unreleased, so no problem there.

Here is Changeling, so listen to it and see what you think

Agrajag wrote: Also, what do you think of recent Oscar Best Score winners? The Score, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing categories were always ones I really had no idea who deserved the win.... Do you get to see and hear a lot of the nominees before Oscar night and do you often disagree with their pics or think, since these categories are voted on by a smaller body (only sound editors can vote Best Sound Editing, IIRC) are they usually the most deserving?
Like in any other categories, there is some inside stuff going on between composers. Elfman was apparently shunned for years; James Horner was apparently a prima donna that refused to salute the winner, when his score for Braveheart didn't win. The even created 2 categories for a few years (Drama or Comedy/musical) since Disney movies kept winning.

As for the winners themselves, I almost never agree... :) But it is a matter of personal taste. The winners are deserving for sure.

here is a few of my disagreements over the last 20 years (But again, these are personal reasons in a lot of cases; Actual winner first/personal winner second)

1992: Aladdin/Basic Instinct
1995: Pocahontas/Toy Story
1996: Emma/james and the giant peach
1997: The FUll Monty/Men In Black
1998: Life is Beautiful/The Thin Red Line or Saving Private Ryan
1999: The Red Violin/American Beauty
2000: Crounching Tiger/Gladiator
2002: Frida/Far From heaven
2004: Finding Neverland/Prisoner of Azkaban
2007: Atonement/Ratatouille
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#60 Post by Agrajag » 04 Dec 2008, 19:55

Amazing... I'll admit my almost complete ignorance with scores... They are there in the background, often going unnoticed. I wouldn't have even thought films like Aladdin or Toy Story would have a score--I remember more of the soundtrack to Aladdin and Randy Newman tunes (again soundtrack, right?) for Toy Story.

But I guess, now that I think about it, every film has a score, doesn't it? Just the incidental music between or beneath scenes make up the score, right?
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#61 Post by Sela » 04 Dec 2008, 20:02

Agrajag wrote:Amazing... I'll admit my almost complete ignorance with scores... They are there in the background, often going unnoticed. I wouldn't have even thought films like Aladdin or Toy Story would have a score--I remember more of the soundtrack to Aladdin and Randy Newman tunes (again soundtrack, right?) for Toy Story.

But I guess, now that I think about it, every film has a score, doesn't it? Just the incidental music between or beneath scenes make up the score, right?
Correct. And some have very incidental music (A few seconds in...and gone).
Sometimes, I enjoy this type of score. But the ones that really move are those which have a more symphonic quality to it. They can be listened without even watching the movie, and you feel what the composer was trying to convey.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#62 Post by Middle » 05 Dec 2008, 00:16

I don't know if these interest you at all, but I tend like to somewhat more minimalistic scores. They are often very effective, although they might miss that 'sweeping away' feeling most Hollywood scores have (think Hans Zimmer).
Good examples for me would be the theme songs from 'The Usual Suspects' , 'Goodbye Lenin' ('Amelie Poulain' as well, but they are very alike), and the music from 'Solaris' I pointed out earlier.
Can you maybe give some thoughts and/or recommendations in a future post?
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#63 Post by Egbert Souse » 05 Dec 2008, 13:02

Must-Have: The Last of the Mohicans – Trevor Jones & Randy Edelman
Two renowned names for 1 score. Each with a very distinctive sound (And clearly identified “who-did-what”) The results is an incredible blend of styles, that should be part of everyone’s collection
An excellent soundtrack that is among one of the favorites in my collection. From Trevor Jones I also like Merlin and from Randy Edelman, Gettysburg.

I would also like to give a "thumbs up" for Howard Shore's, Nobody's Fool. It is not as well known as his other scores, but is very nice.

Here is a bit of trivia about Howard Shore. He was the first musical director of Saturday Night Live back in 1975 when the show first aired.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#64 Post by Sela » 05 Dec 2008, 13:38

Egbert Souse wrote:
Must-Have: The Last of the Mohicans – Trevor Jones & Randy Edelman
Two renowned names for 1 score. Each with a very distinctive sound (And clearly identified “who-did-what”) The results is an incredible blend of styles, that should be part of everyone’s collection
An excellent soundtrack that is among one of the favorites in my collection. From Trevor Jones I also like Merlin and from Randy Edelman, Gettysburg.

I would also like to give a "thumbs up" for Howard Shore's, Nobody's Fool. It is not as well known as his other scores, but is very nice.

Here is a bit of trivia about Howard Shore. He was the first musical director of Saturday Night Live back in 1975 when the show first aired.
I was told you might be coming around this thread... Welcome, welcome ;)

Jones and Edelman will be definitely featured in due time. Jones is probably my favorite of the two; among my favorites would be "Dark City", "Desperate Measures", "Cliffhanger" and "The Dark Crystal".

As for Shore on SN, I knew, but looking harder, I found out that he was even in some sketches
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#65 Post by Egbert Souse » 05 Dec 2008, 14:19

Sela5:
Great entries! I look forward to reading your next one.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#66 Post by Middle » 08 Dec 2008, 01:49

Middle wrote:I don't know if these interest you at all, but I tend like to somewhat more minimalistic scores. They are often very effective, although they might miss that 'sweeping away' feeling most Hollywood scores have (think Hans Zimmer).
Good examples for me would be the theme songs from 'The Usual Suspects' , 'Goodbye Lenin' ('Amelie Poulain' as well, but they are very alike), and the music from 'Solaris' I pointed out earlier.
Can you maybe give some thoughts and/or recommendations in a future post?
Funny to see that this was posted on the IMDb front page today:

The art of the Title Sequence (Usual Suspects)

Hearing it again, it's not really that 'minimal', but I think you get my point.

Another thing I was thinking about would be interesting to discuss is the music made by key persons involved in making the film. John Ottman for Usual Suspects could (again) be an interesting one, Clint Eastwood making music for his own movies, and maybe even Tom Tykwer for Run, Lola, Run (although the techno might put people off).
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#67 Post by Sela » 10 Dec 2008, 12:45

The Master: Part 3

Once again, more Goldsmith. How could I not. So many good scores, from so many different genres

Image Today’s theme would be genre variety I guess. In a way, they all are since he created music for war films, horror, comedies, action or adventure. But today’s examples are mostly from smaller titles.

It is easy to forget the music for many of those (Or even the films themselves) But they are the kind of music that once discovered, one enjoys listening to over and over

Wikipedia / IMDB


Relevant website

Jerry Goldsmith’s Online

Beautiful online tribute and resource center for the famed composer


A Few more favorites
Lionheart
Occasionally, director and composer enjoy a specific relation that brings the best music works to light. Spielberg and Williams is always a perfect example. In Goldsmith case, is his work with director Franklin J. Schaffner (Planet of the Apes, Islands in the Stream, Patton) This is a perfect example of a smaller title with a fantastic score to it.
Originally there were 2 volumes sold separately with music. They were then condensed in the more widely available version today. But unfortunately not all the music is there.
Track: The Banner


Matinee
Director Joe Dante used Goldsmith also in most of his films (Gremlins, The Burbs, Innerspace). This was definitely a smaller title, filled with sentimentality, and a certain comedic tone. Very enjoyable
Track: Coming Attraction

The Russia House
A magnificent example of Goldsmith craft, mixing a jazz theme, with some nervous strings for the action. Unfortunately, the released CD contained most of the basic love them, foregoing the more incidental action score. So it may sound repetitive. But it is still one of his most beautiful themes
Track: Katya

Congo
Another “tribal” experiment, born out of the success of Jurassic park. Goldsmith correctly creates an entertaining action score, mixed with some more ethnic sounds.
Track: Gates of Zinj

The Sand Pebbles
A landmark title for the composer, arguably his biggest at the time, was unreleased for years. Varese Sarabande records resurrected it in his Limited Club releases a few years ago, restoring almost all the music. A true gem for any music lover in this classic score
Track: Overture



Collectors corner, Must-Have & Small Gems

As the section indicates, here I’ll try to name 3 scores; the first, a difficult to find title, the second, is pretty much given, and the third, is a score that you may not think about that often (mainly due to the quality of the film), but it’s a surprising find.

Collector’s corner: Night Crossing – Jerry Goldsmith
A largely forgotten Cold War drama based on the true story about two families that escaped East Germany into West Germany in 1979. Here Goldsmith provided one of his most thrilling and tense scores. And for Disney movie no less!!!
Track: Final Flight

Must-Have: Hoosiers – Jerry Goldsmith
One of the most inspirational sport movies ever, boasts what many consider the best score for the genre. It’s no surprise that the same team later created another memorable turn with “Rudy”
Track: The Pivot

Small Gems: Small Soldiers – Jerry Goldsmith
Almost a parody of his own scores (Patton’s theme can be heard throughout the film), it is still a zany great example of how mischievous film music can be.
A very short original release, there are plenty of expanded bootleg copies out there (Even the orchestra recording sessions have made it to the internet)
Track: Roll Call


Trivia

By my count, Goldsmith was nominated for 18 Academy Awards, 7 Emmys, 6 Grammys and 9 Golden Globes
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#68 Post by Egbert Souse » 10 Dec 2008, 12:53

Must-Have: Hoosiers – Jerry Goldsmith
One of the most inspirational sport movies ever, boasts what many consider the best score for the genre. It’s no surprise that the same team later created another memorable turn with “Rudy”
Track: The Pivot
I would love to have the soundtrack to this movie. Hoosiers is my all-time favorite sports movie.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#69 Post by Agrajag » 11 Dec 2008, 17:56

Sela5 wrote:The famous shower scene from “Psycho” was originally going to be, thru Hitchcock’s vision, played with no music.
Classic film composer Bernard Herrmann, Hitchcock’s frequent collaborator, had already seen Hitch pull his music out for a scene (The plane sequence from “North by Northwest”). But this time, he convinced the director that he could create something perfect for it. And he did.
I could probably look up on IMDb or Google, but this is easier...

I was looking at some Hitch scores--with NxNW being my default "Favorite Movie" answer, I looked into Herrmann's score. I've found an Original Motion Picture Soundtrack w/ 12 tracks but also a Complete Score disc which talks about the premiere of "The Highway" (the second longest cue from the score, never before released). I take it this is the rub for true collector's like yourself. Studios releasing bare bones versions, and the complete scores rarely getting a release, or a very limited one.

For my DVD collection, I always get upset when stuidos double dip (the normal 1-Disc Hot Fuzz is released July 07 -- then the 3-Disc Collector's Edition is released four months later :balrog:) I assume your 1500+ collection isn't all on CD (maybe some vinyl in there, but probably a lot of downloaded content) -- You already said you'll download a score to see how it is, and only go after the CD if you really enjoy it. How often do you find yourself double dipping with the barebones soundtracks and then later the full scores?
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#70 Post by Sela » 11 Dec 2008, 19:12

Agrajag wrote:
Sela5 wrote:The famous shower scene from “Psycho” was originally going to be, thru Hitchcock’s vision, played with no music.
Classic film composer Bernard Herrmann, Hitchcock’s frequent collaborator, had already seen Hitch pull his music out for a scene (The plane sequence from “North by Northwest”). But this time, he convinced the director that he could create something perfect for it. And he did.
I could probably look up on IMDb or Google, but this is easier...

I was looking at some Hitch scores--with NxNW being my default "Favorite Movie" answer, I looked into Herrmann's score. I've found an Original Motion Picture Soundtrack w/ 12 tracks but also a Complete Score disc which talks about the premiere of "The Highway" (the second longest cue from the score, never before released). I take it this is the rub for true collector's like yourself. Studios releasing bare bones versions, and the complete scores rarely getting a release, or a very limited one.

For my DVD collection, I always get upset when stuidos double dip (the normal 1-Disc Hot Fuzz is released July 07 -- then the 3-Disc Collector's Edition is released four months later :balrog:) I assume your 1500+ collection isn't all on CD (maybe some vinyl in there, but probably a lot of downloaded content) -- You already said you'll download a score to see how it is, and only go after the CD if you really enjoy it. How often do you find yourself double dipping with the barebones soundtracks and then later the full scores?
That's hard to answer really. The internet has made 2 things possible: collectors are sharing straight to each others, and labels are able to provide directly to the consumer.

So, on one side, very rare editions and many bootlegs that in the past would have never seen the light of day are being distributed.

For the labels, selling in such a direct way has been incredibly helpful; they cut middle costs, and they can reach the whole globe without needing a sales department. And one of their main basis of promotion for the titles is making them a limited run (often 1000 to 3000)

This 2 reasons have made it possible for all this "complete" and "Expanded" scores to appear. And "NxNW" is a perfect example. I've had one of the original releases for many years. Then, not long ago, Varese Sarabande records published the complete score in a limited run of 3000 copies. I bought it. Because it was a score that I truly enjoyed, and felt that there was music missing. Same deal with "Ghostbusters".

Those are the kind of cases in which I don't mind double dipping. Because I have an affinity to the score itself or its one of those favorite composers that I love.

But I don't always do it. I've had other scores in my hand of which I may have the original, and don't feel like I need to expand that particular title. I have a great copy of "Robin & Marian"; I just found out that a new expanded edition comes out next month. But I won't go for it. Instead, I'll buy its companion title, "the Cassandra Crossing" which has been a rare title for years, and its being re-released with it. It further completes my Goldsmith collection with a title that I've never purchased in the first place :)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#71 Post by Sela » 11 Dec 2008, 19:17

BTW, some labels are truly making a mockery of this "expanded" business. Varese Sarabande is not one of those. It is the premier film score label in the world, and a couple of years ago they brought back their CD club, where every 3 months, they come up with limited editions of hard to find, expanded or never released scores. And some editions go out quick (Predator now fetches $150+ on eBay)

You can check it out here. When I find out that they have new releases, I'm logging in that morning, trying to see if it's something I'm interested in :)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#72 Post by Egbert Souse » 12 Dec 2008, 08:02

Black beauty
Another of his lesser known titles. But trust me, it is a gorgeous theme, and a beautiful symphonic score mixing celtic/irish sounds in the recording.
I recently discovered this soundtrack. It is very nice, indeed.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#73 Post by Sela » 17 Dec 2008, 08:02

I'm actually pretty busy at work... and I have our annual company meeting today, so I think the pst will go up tomorrow
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#74 Post by Philip » 17 Dec 2008, 22:10

I love this thread. Are we allowed to drop hints? Because if so, Lalo Schiffrin.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#75 Post by Sela » 18 Dec 2008, 05:03

Philip wrote:I love this thread. Are we allowed to drop hints? Because if so, Lalo Schiffrin.
You are all welcome to participate in any way you see fit. As for Schifrin....Bullitt....
8 more months of school.....
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