The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

or: How I learned to stop worrying and love other types of entertainment, too.
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Middle
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#26 Post by Middle » 06 Nov 2008, 05:49

Sela5 wrote:Now, if you have a chance, look on bitTorrents, and try to find the expanded Batman Begins score. Not only do the tracks have normal names, but there are a couple of very important ones missing from the regular release (Mainly, the Batmobile Chase & the Closing Credits).
I noticed that too; I was unable to find the actual point where the end-credits start.
Sela5 wrote:Piece of trivia; the Batman Begins cd track names are "Babastella", Nycteris", etc. These are types of bats. But, take the first letter of those tracks, starting on number 4....
That's a nice touch. Thanks for pointing that out.

Edit:
Sela5 wrote:Personally, "Like a dog chasing cars" is the one that makes my blood pump. A rising rhythm, a sense of urgency, and a hopeful theme that keeps going higher and higher... and gets stopped in his tracks by the Joker theme.
I think 'Like a dog' is the most complete theme on the soundtrack album. I really like it too, while the 'Watch the World Burn' is more desperate; I think it fits the hopelessness of the film's end best, and because it feels so disconnected from the rest of the themes on the soundtrack, it therefore delivers best.
Sela5 wrote:As for which one I think is more memorable, I have to go with Elfman's. It is the main theme, presented clearly in the film. Begins/Dark Knight have a couple of themes that move around, and even the main theme doesn't get his full development until the closing credits.
I think I agree to your take, and while I do like the Zimmer/Howard soundtrack better, the Elfman theme is the more recognisable 'theme'.
Last edited by Middle on 06 Nov 2008, 06:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#27 Post by TravisBickle » 06 Nov 2008, 05:50

Whilst we're on about more recent movies, I love "Orbital's" version of the theme to the crap that was "The Saint" and also "Larry Mullen's/U2's" take on "Mission Impossible".
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#28 Post by Sela » 06 Nov 2008, 07:03

TravisBickle wrote:Whilst we're on about more recent movies, I love "Orbital's" version of the theme to the crap that was "The Saint"
Surprisingly enough it wasn't on the film score release, which is a really good one (Prime example of a great score for a crappy movie)

TravisBickle wrote:and also "Larry Mullen's/U2's" take on "Mission Impossible".
Yep, I can live without Clayton's version....
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#29 Post by Sela » 06 Nov 2008, 07:09

Middle wrote:
Sela5 wrote:Personally, "Like a dog chasing cars" is the one that makes my blood pump. A rising rhythm, a sense of urgency, and a hopeful theme that keeps going higher and higher... and gets stopped in his tracks by the Joker theme.
I think 'Like a dog' is the most complete theme on the soundtrack album. I really like it too, while the 'Watch the World Burn' is more desperate; I think it fits the hopelessness of the film's end best, and because it feels so disconnected from the rest of the themes on the soundtrack, it therefore delivers best.
It is such a dark and ominous part, so in contrast with Dent's earlier theme. You can almost name it the "Doomsday theme"
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#30 Post by Sela » 11 Nov 2008, 15:20

Before I work on today's post, I wanted to add this tribute here



Lyrics can be found here

And yes, John Williams IS the man
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#31 Post by Agrajag » 11 Nov 2008, 21:20

Sela5 wrote:Before I work on today's post, I wanted to add this tribute here



Lyrics can be found here

And yes, John Williams IS the man
That was pretty fun
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#32 Post by Sela » 11 Nov 2008, 23:30

Hey mister, this CD is very short…

Last time I mentioned a place called “Cinescor” in Madrid. That place was my second home for years. It was simply a music store specialized in soundtracks and theatre music. A dream come true for a novice collector. Its owner has since then become on of my very best friends. Here I had a chance to compare knowledge with persons who shared my interests, and listen to music I didn’t even know existed. And it was there that I started finding out a few facts about the released music on CD’s.

One of them was, that for many record companies, film score publishing is a very marginal business. Except for very specific examples (e.g. Star Wars, Titanic,) no film score sells highly. Soundtracks do, but scores not so much. So the production of titles was always very limited. Titles would be normally produced to coincide with the release, but after initial runs, they would stop producing more, making many of this titles out-of-print. This scarcity makes some of this titles highly sought after.

Thankfully there are also some labels specialized in films scores. Varese Sarabande Records is one of the main ones. A company almost exclusively dedicated to releasing scores. And there are others, like Intrada or Milan Records. But a lot of these releases are very short. Very often, under 30 minutes of the music are included in the discs. This has to do with the amount of royalties the labels have to pay for the discs, which are based on the length of said discs.

So, a lot of music actually goes unreleased, which makes complete or extended editions highly sought after too. But like in many other cases, the internet will play a big role in a fundamental change for film score collectors. A change that I’ll go thru in detail in my next post.


Outstanding release(s)

The Lord of the Rings: The Complete Recordings

The original releases for the scores of The Lord of the Rings were high quality ones. An excellent example of cramming as much music as possible in 74 minutes cd’s. A total of 3 ½ hours of award winning music.

But that was not enough, and a couple of years after the original releases, the complete editions for each of the films was made available. Beautifully boxed sets, with excellent notes. 11 cd’s in total. And each title with an audio DVD of each score with a 5.1 mix. A dream come true for a film music lover like me.

They were limited releases, but copies are easily found via Amazon or Ebay. Expensive, but worth every penny.
Release description wrote:
(This pertains to The Fellowship of the Ring complete recordings)
An epic film score receives epic treatment with The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring/Complete Recordings. Released for the first time on CD, the complete score for the first film in the Lord of the Rings trilogy contains more than 180 minutes of music on three CDs plus a DVD-Audio disc of the entire score in Surround Sound. Breathtaking and majestic, the 2001 Oscar and Grammy winning score compsted by Howard Shore also includes Enya's Oscar nominated "May It Be." For fans of any of The Lord of the Rings films, the Fellowship of the Ring/Complete Recordings is an essential experience.
Track: Return of the King: The White Tree


Relevant website

Soundtrack.Net

Another great film music site, with reviews, news on upcoming releases, exclusive features and the best resource for trailer music.


A favorite composer: Danny Elfman (& 2)

Picking just a handful of favorites last ime was too hard. This time, I’m going with other lesser titles that I feel warrant some consideration too.
Wikipedia / IMDB

A Few more favorites
Good Will Hunting
For a movie in which the dialogues are the main driving force, Elfman’s subdued score might not be so recognizable. Listening to it, with its simpler, more Irish sound, one can truly appreciate its minimalistic approach. Just a handful of instruments and very light choral sounds.

Men In Black
If I had to define this score, I’d have to label it as retro; both for its actual main theme sound, and also, for Elfman’s return to it’s rock roots, mixing orchestra sounds with electric guitar.

Nightbreed
It was Elfman’s first adventurous score, using tribal rhythms to help elevate the horror. Because this was supposed to be a horror film… Still is a magnificent piece

Sleepy Hollow
The perfect mix of Gothic horror orchestra with choral layers. It is the evolution of Elfman’s horror sound, starting with “Nightbreed”, continuing with “The Frighteners”, and achieving its best results here. Grandiose and macabre

Beetlejuice
A rollercoaster ride, zany and perhaps too incidental to be listened as a whole. But it is still an enjoyable ride


Collectors corner, Must-Have & Small Gems

As the section indicates, here I’ll try to name 3 scores; the first, a difficult to find title, the second, is pretty much given, and the third, is a score that you may not think about that often (mainly due to the quality of the film), but it’s a surprising find.

Collector’s corner: Hocus Pocus – John Debney
A very scarce promotional release, mainly released thru its own composer (John Debney – Cutthroat Island, I Know What You Did Last Summer, The Relic, Elf). 33 minutes of hijinks, tempo changes and, in general, a delightful and magical score.
The original copies were, for many years, one of the top 10 most sought after scores.
Track: Witches on Holiday

Must-Have: The Magnificent Seven – Elmer Bernstein
Arguably, some of the most famous film music ever composed. Just go ahead and tell me that you don’t recognize the main theme.
There is a widely available, re-recorded album with the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra in Koch Records, that the composer considers the ultimate interpretation.
Track: Main Titles and Calvera’s Visit

Small Gems: Much Ado About Nothing – Patrick Doyle
Exuberant and jubilant; one of the many collaborations between the composer and Kenneth Branagh, and considered by many as his masterpiece. Works mainly by using two main themes, one for the men, and the other for the women. An excellent approach for a story mainly based on the Battle of the Sexes
Track: Overture


Trivia

The famous shower scene from “Psycho” was originally going to be, thru Hitchcock’s vision, played with no music.
Classic film composer Bernard Herrmann, Hitchcock’s frequent collaborator, had already seen Hitch pull his music out for a scene (The plane sequence from “North by Northwest”). But this time, he convinced the director that he could create something perfect for it. And he did.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#33 Post by Nunis » 12 Nov 2008, 00:44

Another excellent post in a thread I've been thoroughly enjoying since its inception. And using the FoxyTunes plugin's Yahoo player to play these clips while reading makes it even more enjoyable. Thank you for those.

I have the complete LotR recordings, and they are magnificent. I often listen to them while I work. I love Much Ado, but I can't say I've ever paid much attention to the music before. Maybe it's due a revisit.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#34 Post by Nunis » 12 Nov 2008, 00:46

Oh, and that John Williams tribute is one of the best things I've seen in a very long time. Had to watch it a couple of times. Brilliant.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#35 Post by Middle » 12 Nov 2008, 01:28

Nunis wrote:Oh, and that John Williams tribute is one of the best things I've seen in a very long time. Had to watch it a couple of times. Brilliant.
That was awesome... (and probably the most nerdy thing I've seen the past year - that's probably why I enjoyed it...)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#36 Post by Sela » 12 Nov 2008, 07:45

Nunis wrote:Another excellent post in a thread I've been thoroughly enjoying since its inception. And using the FoxyTunes plugin's Yahoo player to play these clips while reading makes it even more enjoyable. Thank you for those.

I have the complete LotR recordings, and they are magnificent. I often listen to them while I work. I love Much Ado, but I can't say I've ever paid much attention to the music before. Maybe it's due a revisit.
Glad you like it so much.

It is something I've wanted to do for a long time. My only problem while I do it is choosing CD's. I literally stare at my collection trying to pick something specific. But so many choices come to mind...
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#37 Post by TravisBickle » 13 Nov 2008, 00:29

Nunis wrote:Oh, and that John Williams tribute is one of the best things I've seen in a very long time. Had to watch it a couple of times. Brilliant.
:green:
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#38 Post by TravisBickle » 14 Nov 2008, 11:56

I know I've already mentioned Michael Nyman's music to "The Draughtsman's Contract", but I was looking through my collection tonight and found the greatness that is the music from "The Piano". Bliss to listen to when in the right mood, ie pissed off, melancholic, drunk and flailing around the room, etc.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#39 Post by Nunis » 17 Nov 2008, 01:31

I was doing some writing yesterday (working in the ever-so-wonderful WriteRoom), and I was listening exclusively to the Lord of the Rings scores and the Nobody's Fool score that Sela provided me with.

It was wonderful. Just me, Howard Shore, and my text. Got the creative juices flowing, so to speak, and gave me a calm and completely distraction-free environment.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#40 Post by Sela » 17 Nov 2008, 09:45

Nunis wrote:I was doing some writing yesterday (working in the ever-so-wonderful WriteRoom), and I was listening exclusively to the Lord of the Rings scores and the Nobody's Fool score that Sela provided me with.

It was wonderful. Just me, Howard Shore, and my text. Got the creative juices flowing, so to speak, and gave me a calm and completely distraction-free environment.
Ahh, then we should definitely work on some more Shore on your menu. "Philadelphia" should do the trick... :)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#41 Post by Nunis » 17 Nov 2008, 09:49

Sela5 wrote:
Nunis wrote:I was doing some writing yesterday (working in the ever-so-wonderful WriteRoom), and I was listening exclusively to the Lord of the Rings scores and the Nobody's Fool score that Sela provided me with.

It was wonderful. Just me, Howard Shore, and my text. Got the creative juices flowing, so to speak, and gave me a calm and completely distraction-free environment.
Ahh, then we should definitely work on some more Shore on your menu. "Philadelphia" should do the trick... :)
Oh yay, thank you! :)

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#42 Post by Dawson » 17 Nov 2008, 10:09

What about a soundtrack to something like Judgement Night? All performed by artists, but all performed especially for the film, what do we think about that?
I say nothing beats hearing De La Soul and Teenage Fanclub performing together.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#43 Post by F.N.G. » 17 Nov 2008, 13:16

dawson99 wrote: I say nothing beats hearing De La Soul and Teenage Fanclub performing together.
Not hearing De La Soul and Teenage Fanclub performing together.

I win. :D
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#44 Post by Dawson » 18 Nov 2008, 00:16

that's just.... mean
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#45 Post by F.N.G. » 18 Nov 2008, 08:54

dawson99 wrote:that's just.... mean
Now that you've said it, I'm actually now curious to hear what that would sound like. Not imagine greatness, I gotta say, but should be a strange combination.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#46 Post by Sela » 18 Nov 2008, 23:26

dawson99 wrote:What about a soundtrack to something like Judgement Night? All performed by artists, but all performed especially for the film, what do we think about that?
I say nothing beats hearing De La Soul and Teenage Fanclub performing together.
Dawson, I can't say I've listened to this particular track. I do enjoy soundtracks as much as the next guy (In a similar vein to what you propose, I recommend Spawn: the Album, with collaborations between artists on each song)

But, I'm going more for film scores in this thread. Nothing against soundtracks, so please feel free to continue on those as often as you like. They are just not my main area of interest 8)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#47 Post by Sela » 18 Nov 2008, 23:28

You have no idea no idea what I found on the web today….

So, last time I mentioned that I was going to point out the internet effect on film scores. However, thinking about it a bit more, that’s not it. It’s simply technological advances. Advances that allow the sharing of music.

For once, now we can all produce our own CD’s, a medium with little degradation (And if you need a new one, you just burn another). With a little investment, anyone can have an industry type duplicator.

The formats themselves have improved, from CD’s to electronic media. Now everyone can share and import MP3’s. And sharing this files via the net is just as simple as drag and drop.

All this advancements combined, have made it possible for this little music niche to expand, and touch many more collectors at the same time. And now, rare and out-of-print scores are easily available. People sharing and finding those rare scores that for years you only saw on a friends collection, or announced for auctions.

It’s gotten even, a bit oversaturated. Now it’s not just about finding the complete editions. Now there are original recording sessions being shared. Expanded, re-expanded and complete editions… Almost too much. So, like everything else, moderation is key. Research helps to find about the quality of this recordings, and to see if they are worth the time and effort.

I can say from experience, that I’ve had plenty of rewards, finding some titles that had eluded me for years.

Anyway, there is another way that the market has changed, and that is thru e-commerce. So that’s for the next time

Outstanding upcoming release(s)

The Dark Knight-Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (2 CD Special Edition)

A limited release, slated for December 9 (Coincides with the DVD release); it’s basically the original release on the first CD, and brand new themes on the second.

It’s strange to find this kind of releases being done by the original publisher. So it is a welcomed piece. Just from looking at the track names, I can see that we will have a chance to listen to some of the tracks that I was missing on the first release. Particularly concerning the Joker’s final attack (The Ferries), or his hospital scenes.

“The Dark Knight” was a hard CD for me to listen to the first time around. It took me several tries until I recognized were his strengths lie. Ever since, I’ve been listening to it more, so an expanded version is always time to rejoice.

Now, if we could be so lucky to get an expanded “Batman Begins”, then I’d be flying high…
Amazon wrote:
'The Dark Knight: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack' returns with the ASCAP-winning composers from Batman Begins- Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard for a powerful orchestral score. The Special Edition features the complete score on two CD's plus four bonus remix tracks; it also contains an 8x8x40 page hardbound book.
Track: Like a dog chasing cars


Relevant website

Filmtracks

Reviews and more reviews. I don’t consider them completely impartial (Their dislike for Zimmer seems evident) but their articles and points are good and valid. Always a great resource when researching a title


A favorite composer: Jerry Goldsmith (1 of ???)

One of the greatest names in film music, and always fighting with Danny Elfman for the top spot in this collector’s heart. By my last count, I have 150+ of his scores in various formats, so choosing some will be hard. Probably his greatest asset was the fact that he could tackle pretty much any genre.
Filmtracks Minisite
Wikipedia / IMDB

A Few more favorites
Suites and Themes (1988)
One of the reasons Goldsmith was so loved was because of his concerts, showcasing a lot of his work. He played all over the world, creating suites for some of his most memorable music. This was one of the first CD’s with some of this compilations, including his TV Themes Suite, his Generals Suite (MacArthur and Patton) or a Film Suite.
Track: The Generals’ Suite (McArthur & Patton)


The Film Music of Jerry Goldsmith (2001)
Similar to the above mentioned, but with more music, and a few key changes to the perennial favorite suites. A lot easier to find too

The Omen
His only Oscar (even if he was nominated 18 times), comes with a quintessential horror score, marked mainly for its choral works.

There is just so much to Goldsmith, that I’ll just name a few essentials now until the next post…

Basic Instinct, Rudy, A Patch of Blue, Papillon, Planet of the Apes, the Russia House, Star Trek, Supergirl, Legend, Islands in the Stream, Hoosiers, Ghost and the Darkness, LA Confidential, Gremlins, Lionheart, Alien, Poltergeist, Rambo, The Mummy, Masada, Chinatown, Total Recall


Collectors corner, Must-Have & Small Gems

As the section indicates, here I’ll try to name 3 scores; the first, a difficult to find title, the second, is pretty much given, and the third, is a score that you may not think about that often (mainly due to the quality of the film), but it’s a surprising find.

Collector’s corner: Regarding Henry – Hans Zimmer
A very simple score, with very few instruments, and accentuated by the jazz tones of Bobby McFerrin (Yep, as in “Don’t Worry, Be Happy”) Very scarce nowadays after its original release, but a very interesting notch on Zimmer’s career
Track: Walkin’ Talkin’ Man

Must-Have: The Last of the Mohicans – Trevor Jones & Randy Edelman
Two renowned names for 1 score. Each with a very distinctive sound (And clearly identified “who-did-what”) The results is an incredible blend of styles, that should be part of everyone’s collection
Track: Main Titles

Small Gems: The Man without a Face - James Horner
On a similar vein to “Searching for Bobby Fischer”, James Horner surprises again with a more minimalistic approach. A gorgeous masterpiece, from top to bottom.
Track: Lost Books


Trivia

Danny Elfman contributed one theme to the “Army of Darkness” soundtrack; it was mainly a favor to his friend Sam Raimi, since his name allowed for a better orchestra to be contracted to record the score by Joe LoDuca.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#48 Post by Sela » 25 Nov 2008, 22:41

Next Post will be tomorrow, Once I figure what scores to showcase...
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#49 Post by Middle » 26 Nov 2008, 00:10

Sela5 wrote:Next Post will be tomorrow, Once I figure what scores to showcase...
Looking forward to it.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#50 Post by Sela » 26 Nov 2008, 14:34

A gentleman and a scholar

Generally, I would continue exploring the world of Film Music collecting, and originally I had planned on talking a bit about e-commerce and its effect.

But when it came to showcasing an author, and since I had started with him last week, I decided to work a little harder on the genius of one of the greatest composers of all time, Jerry Golsdmith.
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I first started looking into what works I wanted to showcase. I have after all 100+ of his scores at home. So after selecting them, I started organizing so that they would work on the other sections of the blog, and with the result, I realized I had enough for the next four postings. So, let me start showcasing why he is one of my 2 favorite composers. And I’ll do it by presenting a lot of music here. Not a lot of criticism though. I encourage to listen to the selected tracks, and form your own opinion

Wikipedia / IMDB


Relevant website

Filmtracks’ Tribute to Jerry Goldsmith

Clear and to the point. A great starting point to discover the master.


A Few more favorites
Total Recall
One of the composers favorites. Vibrant, exciting, full of action.
Track: The Dream


The Shadow
One of those clear examples where the music is better than the film itself. A personal favorite.
Track: Chest Pains

Medicine Man
A gorgeous main theme showcases this “tribal” example
Track: The Trees

The Mummy
From one of his last works. Half horror half action score, all Goldsmith
Track: The Sand Volcano

First Blood
Due to the sequels success, it’s easy to remember the type of story First Blood was, but this main theme is a perfect reminder
Track: Home Coming



Collectors corner, Must-Have & Small Gems

As the section indicates, here I’ll try to name 3 scores; the first, a difficult to find title, the second, is pretty much given, and the third, is a score that you may not think about that often (mainly due to the quality of the film), but it’s a surprising find.

Collector’s corner: Islands in the Stream – Jerry Goldsmith
My personal favorite, also happens to be Goldsmith’s too. A beautiful score. And copies can still be found
Track: The Letter

Must-Have: Basic Instinct – Jerry Goldsmith
Another Oscar nomination for Goldsmith (his 15th) for some really steamy music.
Track: Pillow Talk

Small Gems: The Ghost and The Darkness – Jerry Goldsmith
Out of his tribal or ethnic scores, certainly the most authentic one. Another personal favorite
Track: The Bridge


Trivia

Goldsmith sported a long ponytail for many years. Apparently, Sean Connery took inspiration of it for his “Medicine Man” character, which Goldsmith scored. So Goldsmith receives double credit on the film, as Music composer, and Hair Designer
8 more months of school.....
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